Blended Learning

 

When you Google blended learning, one of the first definitions that pops up says that blended learning is “a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through delivery of content and instruction via digital and online media with some element of student control over time, place, path, or pace.” This form of learning is becoming quite popular and appearing more and more in schools. An article called From the Classroom: What Does Blended Learning Look Like? by Bob Lenz poses a question: is blended learning worth the hype?

Lenz goes on to talk about a teacher named Melissa Meyers who uses blended learning in her English class. Meyers talks about the amazing success her students have because of the use of blended learning. Many of her students have severe dyslexia, disorders of written expression, and various forms of speech and language difficulties. With that being said, reading is not something that comes easily to her students. Her students were able to grasp the material better and became more excited about learning. Meyers says that blended learning is something very necessary in her classroom.

After reading the article, I believe that blended learning is a very useful way to reach students who may have trouble understanding concepts in a typical setting. It also can help get students interested in the material. Blended learning would also help students become more familiar with technology and more comfortable with it. That is something pretty significant in the world we live in today.

As a future art teacher, I would incorporated blended learning into my classroom as much as I could. I may not being able to use it quite as much as teachers in other content areas, but I could see myself using it to introduce a lesson or to explain content related to an art project. I’m sure once I get more comfortable with the concept of blended learning, I could think of even more ways to use it in my classroom.

Link to original article:

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/blended-learning-example-classroom-lesson-bob-lenz

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